latest experimental double bass from Dan Barbiero

This from Dan Barbiero, who does some experimental music on double bass.

The latest release from netlabel Electronic Musik comes in the form of an ep from the trio Barbiero, Rouzer and Videll.

Indigo over Red on Grey is an electroacoustic exquisite corpse in which a double bass improvisation served as a foundation track in relation to which sound processing and field recordings were created in a double-blind process, after which all three tracks were combined and mixed.

Indigo over Red on Grey represents one event in an ongoing collaboration among Daniel Barbiero (prepared & unprepared double bass), Gary Rouzer (amplified textures & field recordings), and Chris Videll, aka Tag Cloud (sound sculpture, processing & mixing). Combining diversely-sourced sound elements into audio atmospheres of varying rarefaction, Barbiero/Rouzer/Videll explore the ways in which conventional and extended string techniques can interact with readymade sounds, amplified objects and digital processing.

Download it free here:
http://www.archive.org/details/IndigoOverRedOnGrey

 

Hedgerow messages

Last night was the opening of Pretty Common Things, an exhibition and installation by Joanna Bond at ::the studio:: gallery. It was exhuberant.

First let me tell you the set-up, and then I’ll tell you what we did in the space.

You enter the basement gallery via an outdoor staircase the leads down to a tiny candle-lit courtyard and then a broad corridor, decorated with ethnic wall hangings, fairy lights twining among the silvery cladding on exposed pipes. Jo’s husband, Owain, had a DJ station at one end, with refreshments on a table at the other.

You turn a corner into a narrow hallway, which was lined with potted saplings, birch and other trees. Each one had a red tag with instructions to take the tree home and plant it in the Wildwood reforestation project or you could plant them anywhere. Other than that, the two indoor hedgerows were bare at the start, leafless mid-winter.

The exhibition space is a tiny white room off that hallway. The walls were hung with framed collages created by Jo, and stunning ceramics on shelves and tables. Tiny ceramic seeds were suspended from the ceiling. The collages and paintings featured hand-drawn images from the countryside and hand-drawn maps, with bits of textiles, strips of printed maps, and dried flowers incorporated into some of them. The natural wood frames enhanced the earthy colour scheme. Some had a circular motif, while others had structures like branching trees or streams.

The ceramics were arranged on natural wood shelves and stands. They were hand-built with a plain white underglaze and organic shapes set into the glaze. Jo had made a series of paintings on the countryside hedgerow theme, scanned them and cut them into leafy and circular shapes – a fall of leaves crossing the center of a bowl and spilling over the edge, a bumble bee in the middle of an asymmetrical plate, rows of tiny seeds  or a bird bedecking an espresso cup and saucer. Nature was embedded everywhere in the show.

By the end of the evening, there were lots of red dots on items that had been sold or reserved. If you have a chance, get down there and see them while you can.

The evening started with DJ music and then we did the first of two runnings  of a new surrealist game – Hedgerow messages.

We had a dozen or more people sitting in a circle in the exhibition space. For the first round, Orion (guitar), Pete (concertina) and Allen (fiddle) played music as people settled on cushions, then it became quiet. I gave everyone a brown paper tag  for messages from the unconscious and a writing implement. There were books about nature to use as writing surfaces.

I talked people through Theta State, a performance piece that encourages the audience to relax and be receptive. The music began again, and Jo recited a poem (really the lyrics to a song) that she wrote about hedgerows in the Welsh countryside. The musicians played in the background and carried on for a bit after the end of the poem. When the music stopped, everyone wrote down whatever came into their minds. Most wrote words, some drew pictures. As they finished the tags, they went and tied them onto the saplings.

The audience at the opening contributed to the art installation. As people wandered through the space, they were reading the messages on the tags. The hedgerows blossomed with messages from the audience.

After that, Jo introduced the issue of indiscriminate cutting of hedgerows in Wales and then sang the song with accompaniment.  Then there was live music from The Barefoot Dancers Of The Sea in the large hall.  More people had been coming throughout the evening, so after the live music there were quite a few who had not participated in the first game, so we ran it a second time with a different set. Again, the room was as full as it could be, with a few standing outside writing on their tags. The first time, Pete had led the music but the second time Orion led.  It was lovely!

We had upwards of 30 tags with messages from the unconscious tied onto saplings by the end like prayers, and some people did take trees home with them.

The final part of the evening was a true highlight…Milly Jackdaw told a story about listening to the earth, and Peter Stevenson (Mr. Fox) told one about rabbits running through hedgerows.

It was so hard for people to say goodbye that we ran past the publicised end time, and a group went out for dancing afterward == I didn’t go, still being on the crutch 😦

It was one of the loveliest evenings I have had. Together with gallery owner Ruth Hogg and Hannah, Joy and other artist friends, Jo created a truly magical environment. Thank you!!!!

Pretty Common Things – installation by Joanna Bond

The announcement below is from a post to TTABER. It describes mixed-mode art event at ::the studio:: next week. The artist is Jo Bond. The event combines visual and tactile art, music, and also a small contribution by Rrose Sélavy. It promises to be a special evening indeed.

image of Jo's art from the Facebook event

Joanna Bond
Pretty Common Things

An exhibition of ceramics, drawings and installation. Evoking thoughts and conversations about the consequences of the loss of hedgerows in the united kingdom.

Studio gallery, Basement, The Cambria, marine terrace, Aberystwyth

14th January – 4th February daily 10.00 – 17.30
Free

Private view 14th January
live music, surrealist game, refreshments.
7.30pm till 10.30pm

joanna.bond@gmail.com 07966897393

press release :
Welsh artist Joanna Bond will open an exhibition of her new body of work on January 14 2011 in The Studio Gallery, Aberystwyth.

Joanna has created hand built ceramic ware which will be decorated with 14 pen and ink images which she has drawn and collaged from direct studies of wild flowers, birds and maps of nearby hedgerows. The exhibition will be entitled “pretty common things.” The inspiration for her current run of work came from her distress at the environmental devastation caused when a cutter machine began destroying hedgerows near to her home in Gilfachreda in July 2010.

Collaborating on “pretty common things” with Joanna will be American surrealist artist, Mary Jacob, and the band “Barefoot dancers of the sea”, who visitors can expect to see play live at the opening. “I am writing a song with Becky Wood from Barefoot dancers of the sea about a bird being displaced from its tree.” said Joanna.

Joanna’s previous works include a seven foot mosaic in the South Wales Valley of Ystrad Mynach for the exterior wall of a Chapel, as well as song and dance collaborations at the chapter arts centre in Cardiff.

Joanna says: “It has been an exciting opportunity to develop my style and create art on pots.”She was a potter’s assistant in Ireland for one and a half years and has been working for seven years teaching adults with learning disabilities how to use the therapeutic medium of clay.

The opening will begin at 7p.m. on January 14; guests will be invited to participate in the instillation with thought provoking activities. The artists hope to involve both political and ecological ideas connecting the cutting of hedgerows with the cuts in public and private sectors.  Joanna said: “The exhibition is not only an artistic creation; it will be a political exhibition to publicize and raise awareness of the loss and destruction of this ancient habitat and all the diverse flora and fauna that it supports.”

“The Studio” can be found on the lower ground floor of Marine
Terrace, Aberystwyth.